9/19/2017

Langsdale Lends a Hand with 'Rat Film' Research

Inspection by Health Department, courtesy of the CPHA Collection, via flickr
Next week, Langsdale Special Collections is hosting a colloquium where three fellows are going to give presentations on their research into structural inequality, sharing the information they unearthed in Special Collections over the summer. I say this not only to mention that it’s happening (September 28th at 4 p.m., Learning Commons Town Hall-- see you there!), but because whenever we’re promoting the fellowship, I have go-to collections I use to illustrate the concept, and The Citizens Planning and Housing Association (CPHA) records is one of the best to draw upon. Most of the digitized photos in the CPHA flickr album perfectly portray urban blight and how society has failed its most vulnerable citizens-- scenes of trash-strewn alleys, decaying structures, toppling fences, lean-to shacks, and children playing in the rubble circa the 1940s and ‘50s.  Contextually, many of these photos were taken during inspections by the Health Department, who were surveying the area’s cleanliness and overall habitability for its citizenry.

A Note from Jordan, UB’s Campus Pantry Organizer

Follow UB Campus Pantry on Instagram!
The Langsdale Library is an amazing resource for UB students. Not only do they hold events, workshops, and tutorial sessions that assist students academically, but they also have an extensive collection of resources as well as knowledgeable staff that are happy to lend a hand when it comes to helping students achieve their goals. However, successful students need more than just academic support. They also need to have basic human needs addressed-- to put it simply, students need to eat. In October of 2016, the UB Campus Pantry opened its doors to the campus community. The Campus Pantry is open to all UB students, faculty and staff and is intended to provide supplemental food as well as resources to help students become more financially stable. Since its opening, the pantry has helped over 120 individuals and has given away 1,626 pounds of food. 

9/18/2017

Check it Out: Baltimore: A Political History

 
 
"People from Baltimore glory in its quirky charm, small-town character, and history of North-cum-South culture. Not every native, however, realizes that for much of the nineteenth century, as "mobtown," the city often made its case for being one of the most violent places in the country. Since the death of Freddie Gray in police custody last year, Baltimoreans and the entire nation again focus on the rich and tangled narrative of black-white relations in the city, which once offered an example of slavery existing side by side with the largest community of free blacks in the United States. A distinguished political scientist who spent much of his youth and the large part of his professional career in Baltimore here examines the politics, structure of governance, and role of racial difference in the history of Baltimore, from its founding in the mid-eighteenth century to the recent past. How do we explain its distinctive character?"-From the publisher
 
WATCH: The author Matthew Crenson's interview about this wonderfully detailed history of Baltimore!
 

9/13/2017

Trust the Process

We’ve all been there. It’s midnight the night before a big paper is due. The coffee is percolating 6 hours too early, and I know I’ve got at least 7 hours of work to do before I can submit this bad boy—bad, here, being the operative word. Despite my efforts and my long hours and my sleepless nights, I never got the grades I knew I could earn on my writing until I learned to slow down and trust the process.

Tired memes may be a result of sleepless nights.

I’m talking about the Writing Process: a step-by-step approach to writing that all good writers, in their best moments, employ in different and often unique ways. In its most basic form, the Writing Process starts with prewriting – the steps you take before you begin composing a draft. These steps might include jotting down your ideas, brainstorming, asking questions, doing research, reading, annotating texts, taking notes, concept mapping, outlining, and talking about your ideas with peers and colleagues.

After prewriting comes drafting, and this stage takes on innumerable forms. For most writers, the important thing is to get started. It has been well established that one cannot complete a piece of writing without first sitting down to write. The key is not to become attached to any of the material you produce in the drafting stage, because more likely than not it will get cut to shreds before the end. That’s because the next stage in the process is revision, and many a poorly written sentence has succumbed to its wrath.

Please, metaphorical wrath only.

Revision is a difficult task for almost all writers, in part because it’s nearly impossible to do it alone. Writers need interested, engaged, and knowledgeable readers with whom we can share our work and find out how it sounds in another person’s head. The goal of writing, after all, is to be read by someone else. But how to revise it to make it fit for human consumption? You need the writing process! And that’s where the Writing Center comes in.

We will help you find it.

When you bring a draft of your work to the Writing Center, you’ll work with a peer who faces the same internal struggles as you do whenever they sit down to write. What shall I say? Will my professor think it’s dumb? What’s the best way to organize this discussion? Do my sources even support this thesis? How do I cite a documentary film? Do you think this cheese is safe to eat? While our Writing Consultants don’t claim to know the mysterious workings of professors’ minds, and we probably can’t advise you about the contents of your fridge, we can help with everything else.

So make an appointment at the Writing Center, no matter where you’re at in your work. Your consultant will be happy to talk with you about your thesis, your sources, your organizational strategy, your citations, and even your writing process. We can help you discover new strategies for building an essay from the ground up, and once your process is in place, you can slow down, too, and learn to trust where it will lead you. Writing will still be hard work, but with a little help from the Writing Center, you can get to sleep at a reasonable hour, and get your coffee drinking back in the morning where it belongs.


Coffee and pie not included.

9/11/2017

New Materials at Langsdale Library!!!!


Did you know that Langsdale Library offers a list of all of our newest materials? We do! Each month we'll post an update letting you know about a few select titles, but there are far too many to mention here so be sure to check out our comprehensive online list. There is an RSS feed to the list, so you can subscribe and be updated when new materials get listed each month.

New Materials at Langsdale:
FACULTY AUTHOR

From head shops to whole foods : the rise and fall of activist entrepreneurs

"In the 1960s and '70s, a diverse range of storefronts-including head shops, African American bookstores, feminist businesses, and organic grocers-brought the work of the New Left, Black Power, feminism, environmentalism, and other social movements into the marketplace. Vividly portraying the struggles, successes, and sacrifices made by these unlikely entrepreneurs, Clark Davis writes a new history of movements and capitalism by showing how activists embraced small businesses in a way few historians have considered. "
Joshua Clark Davis, PhD is an esteemed United States history professor at the University of Baltimore in the Division of Legal, Ethical and Historical Studies



Good and cheap : eat well on $4/day

"Kitchen skill, not budget, is the key to great food. If you're living on a tight budget, Brown shows you how to maximize every ingredient and gives you tips on economical cooking methods; shopping and kitchen equipment; and much more."




The cooking gene : a journey through African American culinary history in the Old South 
"A memoir of Southern cuisine and food culture that traces the paths of the author's ancestors (black and white) through the crucible of slavery to show its effects on our food today"--




These are just a few of the many new books, movies, and games at your Langsdale Library. To see the complete listing of new materials check out our list right here! If you want to receive updates when new materials get listed each month, you can subscribe to the list through the RSS feed.
 

8/31/2017

Langsdale Studies Student Success!


This fall the library is piloting a study to find out more about how what we do helps students. We'll be asking for your help in gathering a little more information sometimes about who you are and what you are working on when you visit the library or see us in your classes. Together we hope you can help us find out the best ways for Langsdale to help you get that big shiny A!

If you'd like more information about this effort and how you can help contact Stephen "Mike" Kiel or email langref@ubalt.edu

Footnotes: Eva Anderson's Baltimore Dance Theater Collection Comes to Langsdale



Eva Anderson's Baltimore Dance Theater, poster detail (photo collage), 1982
Anderson floating on air during rehearsal, 1977
Modern dance legend and Howard County resident Eva Anderson has bestowed many gifts in her illustrious life.  For more than 40 years, Anderson mesmerized audiences with her unique, graceful mode of expression by performing on stages around the world-- in places like Italy, Germany, and New York City. She refined her moves and informed her unique style with tireless study, and by immersing herself in modern dance, ballet, and with formal instruction in traditional African dance. Eventually Ms. Anderson brought her dynamism to Baltimore in 1975, where she shared her talents in choreography, teaching, and movement with the Baltimore Dance Theater as an instructor, and later as the artistic director. Dance students-- in Baltimore city, and later in Howard County-- recall being in thrall to Eva Anderson (“Ms. Eva”) who was in the vanguard of modern dance in Baltimore.

8/08/2017

New Semester, New Workshops!

Langsdale and the ALC are thrilled to brag a little about our Fall 2017 semester offering of workshops. We're gearing up for this semester with a full staff and a full list of workshops FREE to UB students.

Whether you're looking to prepare yourself for a statistics course, strengthen your Adobe Creative Cloud skills, learn about plagiarism and APA citation, or set yourself up for the semester with goal setting and time management--the ALC has you covered!

Check out the full selection at ubalt.edu/workshops. Locations and RSVP details can be found at ubalt.edu/calendar.

Make sure you drop by our fall open house and learn about all of services at a Taste of Tutoring:

8/07/2017

New Materials at Langsdale!



Did you know that Langsdale Library offers a list of all of our newest materials? We do! Each month we'll post an update letting you know about a few select titles, but there are far too many to mention here so be sure to check out our comprehensive online list. There is an RSS feed to the list, so you can subscribe and be updated when new materials get listed each month.

New Materials at Langsdale:




Fraud : an American history from Barnum to Madoff 
 "'The United States has always proved an inviting home for boosters, sharp dealers, and outright swindlers. Worship of entrepreneurial freedom has complicated the task of distinguishing aggressive salesmanship from unacceptable deceit, especially on the frontiers of innovation. By tracing how Americans have struggled to foster a vibrant economy without enabling a corrosive level of fraud, this book reminds us that American capitalism rests on an uneasy foundation of social trust'--Book jacket."





Christianity and race in the American South : a history 

"The history of race and religion in the American South is infused with tragedy, survival, and water from St. Augustine on the shores of Florida's Atlantic Coast to the swampy mire of Jamestown to the floodwaters that nearly destroyed New Orleans. Determination, resistance, survival, even transcendence, shape the story of race and southern Christianities. In Christianity and Race in the American South, Paul Harvey gives us a narrative history of the South as it integrates into the story of religious history, fundamentally transforming our understanding of the importance of American Christianity and religious identity."



Anatomy of love : a natural history of mating, marriage, and why we stray 


"Updated to include the latest research on anthropology and internet-age relationships, a revised edition of a classic reference examines the brain's role in love and courtship while making recommendations for returning to traditional patterns of romance. By the author of Why We Love. --Publisher's description."


These are just a few of the many new books, movies, and games at your Langsdale Library. To see the complete listing of new materials check out our list right here! If you want to receive updates when new materials get listed each month, you can subscribe to the list through the RSS feed.