7/30/2015

Documenting Community Arts in Baltimore

Screen capture from the exhibit, normaneross.wordpress.com

For the past two years, the library’s Special Collections department has worked with members of the community to recognize and preserve the legacy of community arts in Baltimore, with particular focus on the contributions of African Americans to the arts.

Last year, we hosted a pre-Artscape event and worked with researchers who conducted oral history interviews in the library. This year, we received a UB grant to digitize 16 mm films from the Cultural Arts Program and worked with a UB undergraduate student to create an exhibit highlighting a community arts leader.

Film Project

When 19 reels of motion picture film returned to the library after digitization, we were thrilled to discover more than 40 individual movies! The collection documents not only poetry, dance, and visual arts from the Cultural Arts Program, but also a wide range of human services and programs from CAP’s parent organization, the Baltimore Urban Services Agency.

Much of the digitized film was created by Baltimore City youth, under the director of producer Rachel Wohl, for Baltimore’s public access television channel, WBFF. Archivists in Special Collections had the opportunity to meet Ms. Wohl and get additional historical details about the films, which can be viewed and downloaded in their entirety here, on the library’s Internet Archive site.

Intern Exhibit

Special Collections was also lucky to have the opportunity to work with UB Integrated Arts intern, Hannah Smith, on an exhibit to honor the legacy of Norman Ross. Mr. Ross devoted his life to Baltimore’s community arts, as a musician and founder of the Cultural Arts Program, the Eubie Blake Museum, and AFRAM, the city’s African-American festival.

In addition to the materials Hannah created for the display case in the Special Collections Research Room on the 4th floor of the library, she also put together a digital exhibit. The exhibit website brings together her biographical research into Mr. Ross’ life, as well as highlights from over 10,000 archival photographic negatives she carefully examined!

As an archivist, I appreciate how working with the recent past affords opportunities to make connections to the present day. Our collaborative efforts to recognize the history of Baltimore’s community arts have connected Special Collections to many talented and committed individuals, and each one of them deserves recognition. Thank you, Norman Ross, Angela Koukoui, Breck Chapman, Pete O’Neal, Rachel Wohl, Janikka Simms, Hannah Smith, and Skip Elsheimer!

7/21/2015

Interview with Blaze Starr from UB student newspaper, 1963


National Library Week, among other things -- 1963


More books make headlines!

I'm amazed to see how many times the UB library made the front page of the student newspaper, simply for receiving book donations!

Also it's ironic to see these headlines and read these articles at a time when most libraries are downsizing their book collections.

Of course, surrounding articles are often fascinating, too, since they reflect then-current events and embody attitudes of an earlier time period.


7/20/2015

Librarian makes the front page!

UB gets a new librarian --  October, 1962.
Not sure why this new librarian article didn't make the TOP of the front page!

7/16/2015

The hub of the university...

The library graced the cover of many issues of UB's student newspaper in the 1960s and 70s. While scanning the student newspapers for Langsdale Library's Special Collections I discovered the library on the front page of a number of issues.

The library regularly hosted speakers and events with a wide range of topics. There was a rally to impeach Nixon, a talk given by a disciple of Gandhi and in 1970 the first-ever Earth Day was celebrated at Langsdale.

The library truly seemed to be the center of campus, even before it was Langsdale Library.

The UB library used to be in Charles Hall and still made it to the front page of the UB student newspaper. Here's and example from 1962, when the UB student newspaper was called The Baloo.

"…behind every great university stands a library…"

Before the new Langsdale Library can be built, the old Langsdale Library had to be built…

The image above is from a 1965 issue of UB's student newspaper. I've been scanning the archival issues from the 60s and 70s which will eventually be online. To view UB's student newspaper from the 80s and 90s check out Langsdale Library's Special Collections here  and check out the current UB Post here 

7/13/2015

New Materials at Langsdale


Did you know that Langsdale Library offers a list of all of our newest materials? We do! Each month we'll post an update letting you know about a few select titles, but there are far too many to mention here so be sure to check out our comprehensive online list. There is an RSS feed to the list, so you can subscribe and be updated when new materials get listed each month.

 New materials at Langsdale: 


"Alexander's Heirs offers a narrative account of the approximately forty years following the death of Alexander the Great, during which his generals vied for control of his vast empire, and through their conflicts and politics ultimately created the Hellenistic Age. Makes full use of primary and secondary sources. Accessible to a broad audience of students, university scholars, and the educated general reader. Explores important scholarly debates on the Diadochi "
While the overriding image of the First World War is of the bloody stalemate on the Western Front, the overall shape of the war arose out of its maritime character. It was essentially a struggle about access to worldwide resources, most clearly seen in Germany's desperate attempts to counter the American industrial threat, which ultimately drew the United States into the war. This radical new book concentrates on the way in which each side tried to use or deny the sea to the other, and in so doing describes rapid wartime changes not only in ship and weapons technology but also in the way naval warfare was envisaged and fought. Melding strategic, technical, and tactical aspects, Friedman approaches the First World War from a fresh perspective and demonstrates how its perceived lessons dominated the way navies prepared for the Second World War.
 
Built in the 1960s, Cidade de Deus (City of God) is a sprawling housing project built to keep the poor as far as possible from Rio's glamorous beaches and resorts. By the 1980s, it has degenerated into a war zone so dangerous that visitors from outside risk being shot to death on sight, a poisonous stew of poverty, drugs, and crime. "If you run away, they get you, and if you stay, they get you, too," says Rocket, who wants to be a photographer. Rocket's brother, friends, and neighbors begin with truck stick-ups, which lead to brothel hold-ups that lead to murder that leads to coke dealing that leads to street brawls with armies of gun-toting 11-year-olds. Soon a full-scale gang war rages in the City of God--understandably not covered by wary Rio photojournalists--but just the opportunity Rocket needs to make his move, get a job at a newspaper, and get out.
Each player strives to be the governer with the most Victory Points (VP) at the end of the fifth year. Players can gain points by influencing the Kings's advisors, constructing valuable buildings, and winning battles against the invading enemies.
 Interested in Langsdale's Game Collection? If you are, contact librarian Mike Kiel at skiel@ubalt.edu
Want to see all of the games in our collection? Check out Langsdale's online list here.

These are just a few of the many new books, movies, and games at your Langsdale Library. To see the complete listing of new materials check out our list right here! If you want to receive updates when new materials get listed each month, you can subscribe to the list through the RSS feed.

6/16/2015

After over 30 Years of Service, Carol Vaeth to Retire

Carol Vaeth, Langsdale Library's Book and Document Delivery Supervisor, will retire on June 30th 2015.  Carol has worked at Langsdale Library for over 30 years, commencing in October of 1984. Most folks at UB and across the USM, will remember her for her multi-decade career supervising and processing Interlibrary Loan (ILL).

During her long career, she has been an active and respected member in numerous organizations and committees, including the first ILL task group for the University System, UMSILL, the USMAI Resource Sharing Task Group formed in 2004, and currently in the new User Services Advisory Group.  She participated for four years in the UB Administrative Council for Shared Governance. Carol is also a founding member of the Maryland Interlibrary Loan (MAILL) group, established in 1986 and still going.

Carol has received numerous awards for her dedicated work.  In 2006, she received the Maryland Library Association's Paraprofessional Award, and the UB Staff Award for Outstanding Customer Service in 2011.  At the 2014 November Service Awards, she was honored for her 30 plus years of Service at University of Baltimore.  During her final months, Carol added the responsibility of chairing the Baltimore Regional Expedited Courier Service (BREILL).

Carol's name has been associated with Interlibrary Loan for so long that after her departure, it will take concentrated effort not to mention her name when making referrals to patrons about our services. Although we will miss her on a daily basis, we are happy for Carol as she steps into the next phase of her journey.

As as avid gardener, Carol is looking forward to growing and harvesting lavender in her retirement. She also plans to do more hiking and will enjoy having new flexibility in her schedule to take short trips.  Thank you for your hard work and dedication over the years Carol!!




6/10/2015

New Materials at Langsdale

Did you know that Langsdale Library offers a list of all of our newest materials? We do! Each month we'll post an update letting you know about a few select titles, but there are far too many to mention here so be sure to check out our comprehensive online list. There is an RSS feed to the list, so you can subscribe and be updated when new materials get listed each month.

 New materials at Langsdale: 



Spam nation : the inside story of organized cybercrime--from global epidemic to your front door
Explores "the criminal masterminds driving some of the biggest spam and hacker operations targeting Americans and their bank accounts. Tracing the rise, fall, and alarming resurrection of the digital mafia behind the two largest spam pharmacies--and countless viruses, phishing, and spyware attacks--he delivers the first definitive narrative of the global spam problem and its threat to consumers
The young T.E. Lawrence
"Lawrence of Arabia's heroism during the Arab revolt and his disgust at the subsequent betrayal of the Arabs in the postwar negotiations have become the stuff of legend. But T. E. Lawrence's adventures in the Levant began long before the outbreak of war. This intimate biography is the first to focus on Lawrence in his twenties, the untold story of the awkward archaeologist from Oxford who, on first visiting "The East," fell in love with Arab culture and found his life's mission.'--From publisher description.
The imitation game
"During the winter of 1952, British authorities entered the home of mathematician, cryptanalyst and war hero Alan Turing to investigate a reported burglary. They instead ended up arresting Turing himself on charges of "gross indecency," an accusation that would lead to his devastating conviction for the criminal offense of homosexuality - little did officials know, they were actually incriminating the pioneer of modern-day computing. Famously leading a motley group of scholars, linguists, chess champions and intelligence officers, he was credited with cracking the so-called unbreakable codes of Germany's World War II Enigma machine. An intense and haunting portrayal of a brilliant, complicated man, "The Imitation Game" a genius who under nail-biting pressure helped to shorten the war and, in turn, save thousands of lives."
Civilization II : the ultimate version of the best-selling strategy game
Allows the player to control the evolution of human civilizations by building an empire, defending it from invaders, and developing social, cultural, and scientific skills. 
Interested in Langsdale's Game Collection? If you are, contact librarian Mike Kiel at skiel@ubalt.edu
Want to see all of the games in our collection? Check out Langsdale's online list here.
 
 
 

These are just a few of the many new books, movies, and games at your Langsdale Library. To see the complete listing of new materials check out our list right here! If you want to receive updates when new materials get listed each month, you can subscribe to the list through the RSS feed.